The Signpost

The following content has been republished from the Wikimedia Blog. Any views expressed in this piece are not necessarily shared by the Signpost; responses and critical commentary are invited in the comments. For more information on this partnership, see our content guidelines.

References

  1. ^ "Wikipedia blocked in Turkey" (Press release). Turkey Blocks. 29 April 2017. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Turkish authorities block Wikipedia without giving reason". World News (Europe). BBC News. BBC. 29 April 2017. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  3. ^ Tomlinson, Akira (29 April 2017). "Turkey blocks Wikipedia as threat to national security". Paper Chase. JURIST. JURIST Legal News and Research Services. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  4. ^ Sezer, Can; Dolan, David (29 April 2017). "Turkey blocks access to Wikipedia". Technology News. Reuters. Istanbul: Thomson Reuters. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Türkei blockiert Wikipedia-Zugang" [Turkey blocks Wikipedia access]. Internetzensur [Internet Censorship]. Deutsche Welle (in German). 29 April 2017. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018. Nutzer berichteten davon, wie sie sämtliche Sprachversionen von Wikipedia nur noch mit Hilfe technischer Mittel wie VPN-Verbindungen nutzen konnten. [Users reported how they could use all language versions of Wikipedia only with the help of technical means such as VPN connections.]
  6. ^ "Türkische Regierung blockiert Wikipedia" [Turkish government blocks Wikipedia]. Politik (Ausland) [Politics (Foreign Countries)]. Focus (in German). Helmut Markwort. 29 April 2017. ISSN 0943-7576. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2018. Die gängigste Methode für türkische Internetnutzer, die gesperrten Seiten zu erreichen ist über ein Virtual Private Network (VPN). [The most common method for Turkish Internet users to reach the blocked pages is over a Virtual Private Network (VPN).]
S
In this issue
+ Add a comment

Discuss this story

Nice effort. Has a slightly higher chance of working than convincing North Korea to allow people to use Internet. Seriously, you can't expect dictatorial govt's to listen. But putting messages like this out there at least shows that we haven't forgotten about the oppressed people in those countries, so I can't blame the effort. There are worse ways to spend our donations/WMF time then to write such PR. --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| reply here 03:08, 30 June 2018 (UTC)[reply]

They've just won an election, so now is a good time to give it a try anyway. Johnbod (talk) 12:22, 30 June 2018 (UTC)[reply]
I agree with Ms. Hershenov's comments, the way Turkey is represented is a process that would be improved by more involvement from Turkish people, and they must not be afraid to engage in that process honestly and openly. Not every country's government enjoys the stability of the the United States or Britain, and it is not the fault of the people who live in those countries (including Syria and other places where Internet access is restricted). There are many reasons for this, but I appreciate WMF efforts to continue to dialogue with the government and explain Wikipedia's open editing model. Seraphim System (talk) 20:10, 4 July 2018 (UTC)[reply]





       

The Signpost · written by many · served by Sinepost V0.9 · 🄯 CC-BY-SA 4.0